July 9 – 20, 2018 » Montréal Summer Workshop on Challenges in Probability and Mathematical Physics

Organizers: Alexander Fribergh (Montréal) , Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill), Omer Angel (British Columbia)

This event is similar to a short thematic semester. There will be a light schedule of talks, leaving a lot of free time to encourage collaborations between participants and promote discussions between members of different subfields in probability theory.

The central topic of the workshop will be random media, with an emphasis on the following themes: spin glasses, percolation problems in two dimensions, branching Brownian motions and log-correlated fields, Liouville quantum gravity, random walks in random environments and random graphs.

Each lecture day will be focused on one particular theme; speakers will be asked to focus their talks on open problems and tools that need to be developed in order to encourage collaborations between participants.

The workshop, a satellite activity of the XIX International Congress on Mathematical Physics that will be held in Montréal on July 23-28,  is jointly supported by the Centre de recherches mathématiques and by the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences.

April 1 – 30, 2019 » Topological and Rigorous Computational Methods for High Dimensional Dynamics

Organizers: Jean-Philippe Lessard (McGill), Konstantin Mischaikow (Rutgers), Jan Bouwe van den Berg (VU Amsterdam)

The focus of this program is on identifying explicit dynamical structures in nonlinear systems that are high dimensional, poorly resolved, or both. In these problems, computational mathematics is often the only feasible way forward.

The first featured workshop explores the computational challenges of rigorously identifying and extracting fundamental dynamical features such as equilibria, periodic orbits, connecting orbits and invariant manifolds in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems. The second featured workshop investigates the development of computational algebraic topological tools for studying multiparameter, nonlinear systems where the nonlinearities are poorly defined.

The main aim is to identify, characterize, and predict nonlinear dynamics from high-dimensional time series data sets. Each workshop is preceded by a hands-on tutorial aimed at graduate students, postdocs and early- to mid-career mathematicians.