March 1 – 31, 2019 » New Developments in Free Probability and Applications

Organizers: Benoît Collins (Kyoto), James Mingo (Queen’s), Roland Speicher (Saarland), Dan-Virgil Voiculescu (Berkeley)

The thematic one-month program “New Developments in Free Probability and Applications,” to be held at the CRM in March 2019, will highlight the depth and beauty of Free Probability theory as well as the various connections with other fields.

In the spring of 1991, Dan Voiculescu was the holder of the Aisenstadt chair at the CRM. At this time, free probability was still in its infancy and only known to a small group of enthusiasts. This was going to change. Voiculescu gave the Aisenstadt Lectures on free probability in Montréal, organizing the material and bringing it with the help of his students Ken Dykema and Alexandru Nica into a publishable form. The resulting book was the first volume in the CRM Monograph Series. On the timely occasion of the 50th anniversary of the CRM, our thematic program will take place where the seed was sown, with Dan Voiculescu as one of the scholars-in-residence.

The program activities will be anchored by two one-week workshops. In the other two weeks, we expect to organize a special program aimed at bringing graduate students and postdoctoral fellows quickly to the frontiers of the subject.

Workshop 1: Free Probability: the theory, its extensions. (March 4-8, 2019)
Workshop 2: Free Probability: the applied perspective. (March 25-29, 2019)

The first workshop will be inclined more to the pure side of free probability, in particular: operator algebras and random matrix theory, and the second workshop will put its emphasis on applications, for example quantum information theory and  mathematical physics.

Alice Guionnet will give the Aisenstadt Chair lecture series between both workshops.

We will focus our attention on recent developments of the field, which include—but are not limited to: traffic freeness, bi-free probability, analysis of free entropy, (free) quantum groups, functional inequalities in free probability, new applications to random matrix theory and quantum information theory, advances in free Malliavin calculus and regularity questions of distributions.

April 29 – May 17, 2019 » Faces of Integrability

Organizers: Jacques Hurtubise (McGill), Nicolai Reshetikhin (Berkeley), Lauren K. Williams (Berkeley)

The theory of integrable systems, with its origins in symmetries, has intricate ties to a wide variety of areas of mathematics. Sometimes the ties are straightforward, but in many cases, the links are more complicated, and indeed somewhat difficult to make explicit.  Some of these interfaces, between integrability, geometry, representation theory, and probability theory will be dominating subjects during the conference and satellite activities.  Themes to be covered include the role of cluster algebras and cluster varieties in the description of moduli spaces, the links between integrable systems and representation theory appearing in such areas as quantum groups and quantization of moduli spaces, and the fascinating interfaces of probability theory, combinatorics and integrable systems appearing in several processes linked to statistical mechanical models.

During the first week of activities, introductory lectures for graduate students will take place, as well as research seminars and discussions. The conference will take place during the second week. During the third week, research discussions and seminars will continue together with follow-up lectures for graduate students.

May 1 – 31, 2019 » Data Assimilation: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications

Organizers: Tony Humphries (McGill), Sebastian Reich (Potsdam & Reading), Andrew Stuart (Caltech)

The seamless integration of large data sets into computational models provides one of the central challenges for the mathematical sciences of the 21st century. When the computational model is based on dynamical systems and the data is time ordered, the process of combining data and models is called data assimilation. Historically, the field has been primarily developed by practitioners within the geophysical sciences; however, it has enormous potential in many more subject areas.

This month-long thematic activity is aimed at developing the underpinning mathematical theory of data assimilation, the process of combining data with dynamical systems to learn hidden states and unknown parameters. The activities will be guided and informed by applications coming from the physical, biomedical, social and cognitive sciences. Methodologies based around particle filtering, ensemble Kalman filtering, optimization and Bayesian inverse problems will underpin the program. Long-term visitors in all of these fields will be present, and a number of short-term visitors will attend around the four workshops devoted to underpinning methodologies, geophysical applications, biomedical applications and applications from the social and cognitive sciences.

June 1 – 30, 2019 » Homological Algebra, Microlocal Analysis and Symplectic Geometry

Organizers: Emmanuel Giroux (UMI CNRS-CRM & ENS Lyon), Stéphane Guillermou (Grenoble Alpes) 

The purpose of this scientific program will be to present and discuss the recent developments in applications of the microlocal analysis of sheaves to symplectic geometry. We will especially focus on the work of Dmitry Tamarkin, the scholar-in-residence for this program, who will lecture on his microlocal category and its relationships with the Fukaya category. The first week of the program will be devoted to introductory lectures in order to provide young participants with the necessary background. In the subsequent two weeks, Dmitry Tamarkin will present his work in the morning sessions, and more discussions on the contents of his lectures will be scheduled in the afternoon sessions. Finally, a workshop will be organized in the last week of the program.

August 1 – 31, 2019 » Quiver Varieties and Representation Theory

Organizers: Joel Kamnitzer (Toronto), Hugh Thomas (UQAM)

The representation theory of quivers (and related preprojective algebras) has been studied by researchers from algebra, while the geometry of quiver varieties has been studied by researchers in geometric representation theory.  This activity will bring together members of these two communities to exchange recent progress and to stimulate further research and collaboration.  Among other topics, we will discuss quantization of quiver varieties, Coulomb branch constructions using quiver varieties, tilting theory for preprojective algebras, and categorification of cluster algebras.