June 11 – July 6, 2018 » Causal Inference in the Presence of Dependence and Network Structure

Organizers: Erica E.M. Moodie (McGill), David A. Stephens (McGill), Alexandra M. Schmidt (McGill)

The goal of most, if not all, statistical inference is to uncover causal relationships, however it is not generally possible to infer causality from standard statistical procedures. In the last three decades, the field of causal inference research has grown at a rapid pace, and yet much of the literature is devoted to relatively simple settings. In this month-long program, we aim to push the frontiers of causal inference beyond simple settings to accommodate complex data with features such as network or spatial structure. We will hold a series of lectures and workshops that address current and novel aspects of causal inference, which involves the uncovering of relationships between variables in an observationally-derived data collection setting. Throughout this program, we will investigate new and challenging settings that have been studied in the conventional statistical literature, but not viewed through the lens of causal inference. The unifying theme of the program is that of complex dependence, with a particular focus on spatial, network, and graphical structures.

July 2 – 6, 2018 » A Celebration of CICMA’s Postdoctoral Program

Organizers: Henri Darmon (McGill), Andrew Granville (Montréal)

The goal of this workshop will be to host the CRM–ISM postdoctoral fellows who have worked in the Centre Interuniversitaire en Calcul Mathématique Algébrique (CICMA) over the last 30 years or so. CICMA includes researchers working in number theory, group theory, and algebraic geometry. The large majority of our postdoctoral fellows have launched successful academic careers of their own, and since then have maintained close ties with CICMA, contributing to its success by sending their students to Montréal and, in some cases, through continued exchanges and collaborations with permanent CICMA members. The CRM 50th anniversary provides an opportunity to bring these researchers back to Montréal and celebrate their achievements and contributions to the scientific life of the number theory group.

July 9 – 20, 2018 » Montréal Summer Workshop on Challenges in Probability and Mathematical Physics

Organizers: Alexander Fribergh (Montréal) , Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill), Omer Angel (British Columbia)

This event is similar to a short thematic semester. There will be a light schedule of talks, leaving a lot of free time to encourage collaborations between participants and promote discussions between members of different subfields in probability theory.

The central topic of the workshop will be random media, with an emphasis on the following themes: spin glasses, percolation problems in two dimensions, branching Brownian motions and log-correlated fields, Liouville quantum gravity, random walks in random environments and random graphs.

Each lecture day will be focused on one particular theme; speakers will be asked to focus their talks on open problems and tools that need to be developed in order to encourage collaborations between participants.

The workshop, a satellite activity of the XIX International Congress on Mathematical Physics that will be held in Montréal on July 23-28,  is jointly supported by the Centre de recherches mathématiques and by the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences.

September 10 – 28, 2018 » Faces of Integrability

Organizers: Jacques Hurtubise (McGill), Nicolai Reshetikhin (Berkeley), Lauren K. Williams (Berkeley)

The theory of integrable systems, with its origins in symmetries, has intricate ties to a wide variety of areas of mathematics. Sometimes the ties are straightforward, but in many cases, the links are more complicated, and indeed somewhat difficult to make explicit.  Some of these interfaces, between integrability, geometry, representation theory, and probability theory will be dominating subjects during the conference and satellite activities.  Themes to be covered include the role of cluster algebras and cluster varieties in the description of moduli spaces, the links between integrable systems and representation theory appearing in such areas as quantum groups and quantization of moduli spaces, and the fascinating interfaces of probability theory, combinatorics and integrable systems appearing in several processes linked to statistical mechanical models.

During the first week of activities, introductory lectures for graduate students will take place, as well as research seminars and discussions. The conference will take place during the second week. During the third week, research discussions and seminars will continue together with follow-up lectures for graduate students.