Launching of the activities of the CRM’s 50th anniversary

March 9, 2018, 4 p.m.

Conference by Jean-Pierre Bourguignon (European Research Council)

Mathématiques, science et technologie, une nouvelle donne – quelques exemples inspirés par les actions du CRM

(Lecture in French with slides in English)

Université de Montréal
Pavillon Jean-Coutu
2940, chemin de Polytechnique
salle S1-151

A reception follows.

See slideshow of the launching.

  • Luc Vinet
    Luc Vinet, le directeur du CRM livre son discours pour le 50e anniversaire du CRM le 9 mars 2018.

Photos by Richard Poissant.

 

April 1 – 30, 2019 » Topological and Rigorous Computational Methods for High Dimensional Dynamics

Organizers: Jean-Philippe Lessard (McGill), Konstantin Mischaikow (Rutgers), Jan Bouwe van den Berg (VU Amsterdam)

The focus of this program is on identifying explicit dynamical structures in nonlinear systems that are high dimensional, poorly resolved, or both. In these problems, computational mathematics is often the only feasible way forward.

The first featured workshop explores the computational challenges of rigorously identifying and extracting fundamental dynamical features such as equilibria, periodic orbits, connecting orbits and invariant manifolds in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems. The second featured workshop investigates the development of computational algebraic topological tools for studying multiparameter, nonlinear systems where the nonlinearities are poorly defined.

The main aim is to identify, characterize, and predict nonlinear dynamics from high-dimensional time series data sets. Each workshop is preceded by a hands-on tutorial aimed at graduate students, postdocs and early- to mid-career mathematicians.

April 29 – May 17, 2019 » Faces of Integrability

Organizers: Jacques Hurtubise (McGill), Nicolai Reshetikhin (Berkeley), Lauren K. Williams (Berkeley)

The theory of integrable systems, with its origins in symmetries, has intricate ties to a wide variety of areas of mathematics. Sometimes the ties are straightforward, but in many cases, the links are more complicated, and indeed somewhat difficult to make explicit.  Some of these interfaces, between integrability, geometry, representation theory, and probability theory will be dominating subjects during the conference and satellite activities.  Themes to be covered include the role of cluster algebras and cluster varieties in the description of moduli spaces, the links between integrable systems and representation theory appearing in such areas as quantum groups and quantization of moduli spaces, and the fascinating interfaces of probability theory, combinatorics and integrable systems appearing in several processes linked to statistical mechanical models.

During the first week of activities, introductory lectures for graduate students will take place, as well as research seminars and discussions. The conference will take place during the second week. During the third week, research discussions and seminars will continue together with follow-up lectures for graduate students.