September 17 – October 14, 2018 » Algebra and combinatorics at LaCIM, a conference for the 50th anniversary of the CRM

Organizers: François Bergeron (UQAM),Srecko Brlek (UQAM), Christophe Hohlweg (UQAM)

Scientific Committee

• François Bergeron (UQAM);
• Valérie Berthé (Université Paris-Diderot);
• Srecko Brlek (UQAM);
• Laurent Habsieger (Université Claude Bernard, Lyon);
• Sylvie Hamel (UdeM)
• Christophe Hohlweg (UQAM);
• Jean-Christophe Novelli (Université Paris-Est);
• Nathan Reading (North Carolina State University);
• Lauren Williams (UC Berkeley).

escription: On the occasion of CRM’s 50th anniversary in 2018, the Laboratoire de Combinatoire et d’Informatique Mathématique (LaCIM) organizes a month of scientific activities to discuss the state-of-the-art and manifold interconnections between the lively topics that have long been at the core of research at LaCIM: algebraic combinatorics, combinatorial representation theory, Coxeter groups theory, combinatorics of words, discrete geometry, enumerative combinatorics, mathematical computer science and their applications. The scientific activities will be articulated around the confirmed participations of Mireille Bousquet-Mélou and Ezra Miller; together with a week-long international conference to be held from the 24th to the 28th of September 2018. This conference will be organized as follows:

* two days session dedicated to subjects related to ties between algebra and combinatorics;
* two days session dedicated to subjects related to ties between combinatorics, theoretical computer science, and statistical physics.

The bridge between the two sessions will be a special event on Wednesday 26th, aiming at underlying 30 years of partnership of LaCIM and CRM through 4 conferences given by:

* Mireille Bousquet-Mélou,
* Ezra Miller,

and by LaCIM’s past and current holders of the Canadian Research Chair, “Algebra, Combinatorics and Mathematical Computer Science”

* Christophe Reutenauer and
* Hugh Thomas.

March 1 – 31, 2019 » New Developments in Free Probability and Applications

Organizers: Benoît Collins (Kyoto), James Mingo (Queen’s), Roland Speicher (Saarland), Dan-Virgil Voiculescu (Berkeley)

The thematic one-month program “New Developments in Free Probability and Applications,” to be held at the CRM in March 2019, will highlight the depth and beauty of Free Probability theory as well as the various connections with other fields.

In the spring of 1991, Dan Voiculescu was the holder of the Aisenstadt chair at the CRM. At this time, free probability was still in its infancy and only known to a small group of enthusiasts. This was going to change. Voiculescu gave the Aisenstadt Lectures on free probability in Montréal, organizing the material and bringing it with the help of his students Ken Dykema and Alexandru Nica into a publishable form. The resulting book was the first volume in the CRM Monograph Series. On the timely occasion of the 50th anniversary of the CRM, our thematic program will take place where the seed was sown, with Dan Voiculescu as one of the scholars-in-residence.

The program activities will be anchored by two one-week workshops. In the other two weeks, we expect to organize a special program aimed at bringing graduate students and postdoctoral fellows quickly to the frontiers of the subject.

The first workshop will be inclined more to the pure side of free probability, in particular: operator algebras and random matrix theory, and the second workshop will put its emphasis on applications, for example quantum information theory and  mathematical physics.

We will focus our attention on recent developments of the field, which include—but are not limited to: traffic freeness, bi-free probability, analysis of free entropy, (free) quantum groups, functional inequalities in free probability, new applications to random matrix theory and quantum information theory, advances in free Malliavin calculus and regularity questions of distributions.

April 1 – 30, 2019 » Topological and Rigorous Computational Methods for High Dimensional Dynamics

Organizers: Jean-Philippe Lessard (McGill), Konstantin Mischaikow (Rutgers), Jan Bouwe van den Berg (VU Amsterdam)

The focus of this program is on identifying explicit dynamical structures in nonlinear systems that are high dimensional, poorly resolved, or both. In these problems, computational mathematics is often the only feasible way forward.

The first featured workshop explores the computational challenges of rigorously identifying and extracting fundamental dynamical features such as equilibria, periodic orbits, connecting orbits and invariant manifolds in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems. The second featured workshop investigates the development of computational algebraic topological tools for studying multiparameter, nonlinear systems where the nonlinearities are poorly defined.

The main aim is to identify, characterize, and predict nonlinear dynamics from high-dimensional time series data sets. Each workshop is preceded by a hands-on tutorial aimed at graduate students, postdocs and early- to mid-career mathematicians.

April 29 – May 17, 2019 » Faces of Integrability

Organizers: Jacques Hurtubise (McGill), Nicolai Reshetikhin (Berkeley), Lauren K. Williams (Berkeley)

The theory of integrable systems, with its origins in symmetries, has intricate ties to a wide variety of areas of mathematics. Sometimes the ties are straightforward, but in many cases, the links are more complicated, and indeed somewhat difficult to make explicit.  Some of these interfaces, between integrability, geometry, representation theory, and probability theory will be dominating subjects during the conference and satellite activities.  Themes to be covered include the role of cluster algebras and cluster varieties in the description of moduli spaces, the links between integrable systems and representation theory appearing in such areas as quantum groups and quantization of moduli spaces, and the fascinating interfaces of probability theory, combinatorics and integrable systems appearing in several processes linked to statistical mechanical models.

During the first week of activities, introductory lectures for graduate students will take place, as well as research seminars and discussions. The conference will take place during the second week. During the third week, research discussions and seminars will continue together with follow-up lectures for graduate students.

May 1 – 31, 2019 » Data Assimilation: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications

Organizers: Tony Humphries (McGill), Sebastian Reich (Potsdam & Reading), Andrew Stuart (Caltech)

The seamless integration of large data sets into computational models provides one of the central challenges for the mathematical sciences of the 21st century. When the computational model is based on dynamical systems and the data is time ordered, the process of combining data and models is called data assimilation. Historically, the field has been primarily developed by practitioners within the geophysical sciences; however, it has enormous potential in many more subject areas.

This month-long thematic activity is aimed at developing the underpinning mathematical theory of data assimilation, the process of combining data with dynamical systems to learn hidden states and unknown parameters. The activities will be guided and informed by applications coming from the physical, biomedical, social and cognitive sciences. Methodologies based around particle filtering, ensemble Kalman filtering, optimization and Bayesian inverse problems will underpin the program. Long-term visitors in all of these fields will be present, and a number of short-term visitors will attend around the four workshops devoted to underpinning methodologies, geophysical applications, biomedical applications and applications from the social and cognitive sciences.